Author Interview with Legendary Writing Part 1

Legendary Writing blog post Part 1I was so excited when LegendaryWriting of Instagram invited me for an author interview. I’ve been following their posts for a while and they have a fabulous writing community, offering loads of inspiration for writers and generating true conversations.

When my interview questions arrived they hadn’t simply churned out the same old stuff, such as ‘when did you start to write?’. They took a genuine interest in my writing and geared their questions towards me, which is pretty awesome – and refreshing.

Here are the questions they posed:

  1. What do you think is the biggest mistake writers make when writing a disabled character and what advice do you have for writers portraying disabled people?
  2. I’ve read a bit of your book and you’re very good at writing dialogue. What advice would you give to writers who want to write convincing dialogue?
  3. In the summary of Visiting Lilly it mentions time travel as a possibility. What kind of world does this take place in? Is it science fiction?
  4. What challenges have you faced writing the Jake Talbot series and how have you overcome them?
  5. What lessons did you learn writing this series that you’ll take with you into the rest of your writing career?

You can read my interview at LegendaryWriting on Instagram.

They’ve kindly let me share the entire interview with you.

Here I answer the question: “What do you think is the biggest mistake writers make when writing a disabled character and what advice do you have for writers portraying disabled people?”

. – Q: What do you think is the biggest mistake writers make when writing a disabled character and what advice do you have for writers portraying disabled people? . – A: The biggest mistake any writer can make when writing about a disabled character is to draw them as a caricature and be disrespectful. If you’re including a character with any kind of disability, whether it be physical, mental or emotional, then you must be empathic. The best way to do this is not to research on the internet, but to go and meet with disabled individuals in person. Speak to them, get to know them. Talk with their friends and relatives, or their caretakers; and actively discover the obstacles and prejudices they’re up against every day. I’ve worked as a counsellor for many years, and this has given me great insight into how people cope with the label of being ‘different.’ Over the years I’ve also had friends with various disabilities and watched them overcome daily challenges. If you’re writing about someone with a physical disability then you can try putting yourself in their shoes for a day, or even an hour. Try this: when you go to the supermarket, take a friend and get them to push you around in one of the wheelchairs the supermarket has by the entrance. Most supermarkets in the UK have them. Stay in the store and in that wheelchair for an hour. Make a mental note of how people look at you, what tone of voice they use and whether they ever make eye contact. I did exactly this a few years back after I’d had minor surgery and couldn’t walk very far. It was an eye-opening experience! #writer #poetsofinstagram #writing #author #reader #amwriting #book #books #bookstagram #bookworm #reading #realtalk #relatable #truth #goals #poems #inspiration #success #quotestoliveby #quoteoftheday #quotes #wisdom #instagood #instalike #instadaily #motivation #writerscommunity #writersofig #writersofinstagram #writerslife

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Read on for Part 2

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